WHY TANZANIA

QUICK FACTS ABOUT TANZANIA

Name: Tanzania – originally established as Tanganyika (in 1961), named after famous Lake Tanganyika. The union with Zanzibar in 1964 led to the integration of the name Zanzibar into the country's name, and as a result, Tanganyika became TANZANIA.

Surface Area: 945,087 km2 = 364,900 sq miles
Population: 40 million
Time Zone: + 3 hrs. GMT
Average Temperature: 26 C or 79 F
Currency: Tanzanian Shilling TSH (1000Tsh = 1USD)
Tribes: 120
Languages: 120
Linguae Francae: Swahili, English
Religion: Muslim, Christian and Pagan; on Zanzibar 95% Muslim
Capital City: Dodoma
Largest City: Dar es Salaam
Founder: Julius Kambarage Nyerere
Government: Republic
President: Dr. Jakaya M. Kikwete
President of Zanzibar: Dr. Ali Mohamed S

Places to Go:
- Southern Circuit
- Northern Circuit
- Mount Kilimanjaro / Mount Meru
- Usambara Mountains, Northern and Southern Pare Mountains
- Volcanoes / The Great Rift Valley
- The Swahili Coast and Zanzibar Archipelago
- Western Border and Lakes

Travel Tips
Visa:
Inquire at the Tanzanian Consulate in your country. For most countries a visa is required, which costs 50 US$ and is issued at your Tanzanian Consulate or at your entrance into the country directly. It is recommended to come already with your visa in your passport, because waiting times at the border crossing points are often tiring.

Credit Card: Although more and more businesses offer the option of using credit cards, it is still generally difficult to find these. Therefore, please bring enough cash with you in order not to get "stuck".

Weather: The weather is always good in Tanzania! Even if it rains, it won't do so for long, and you will never feel cold! By the way, don't believe those who say that you should never visit Tanzania during the rainy season; the sun shines most of the time, and the rain usually lasts only for half an hour to two hours; the longest possible rain lasts for two continuous days, but it never gets cold, and besides, it can be fascinating to experience the Monsoon rain once! Of course, a safari during rain season is not recommended, but going on a holiday for relaxation in Zanzibar can be very enjoyable then, too.

Seasons: The prices are influenced primarily by the season. During peak season hotel prices can rise to almost double their low season rates.

Peak season
High Season
Low season
Jan. 1st – Feb. 28th
March 1st – March 31st
April 1st – May 30th
July 1st – Aug. 31st
June 1st – June 30th
 
Oct. 1st – Oct. 31st
Sept. 1st – Sept. 30th
 
Nov. 1st – Dec. 31st
 

Telephone:

The international code for Tanzania is +255. Bring your mobile phone along, but a cheaper way of communicating on a daily basis will be to buy a Tanzanian SIM card (it costs 2 to 3 US$) and put it in your mobile phone. Ask your service provider if your phone is 'unlocked' and compatible for this type of switch.

Criminality:
Tanzania has a relatively low crime rate. In the big cities, of course, like everywhere in the world, you have to be more careful. In Dar es Salaam or Arusha better watch your bag carefully, but in Zanzibar it is enough just to completely avoid dark areas during the night.

Tipping:
Tips are paid for what they are there for: you are happy with the service, let the person know!
Tips are given to waiters, of course, but also to tour guides, drivers, etc.
Tips to waiters: I'd recommend 5-10% of the amount paid.
Tips to tour guides and drivers on safari: 10 to 20 US$ per person per day.
Tips to guides and drivers on short tours (2-4 hours): 5 US$ per person per tour.

Electricity:
220 - 240 V, 50 Hz, British Style 3 point sockets (adaptors can be easily purchased)

Water:
You can wash yourself and have a shower with tap water, no problem. Please do not drink tap water though! Either buy ready bottled mineral water (check that it is properly sealed), or boil water. Another option is to put 3 drops of iodine into 1 liter of tap water, leave it standing for 20 minutes, then the water has been purified.

Dress: Tanzanians are very tolerant. They dress the modest way they are brought up to dress, but you will hardly ever meet criticism for dressing differently. Yet, as the saying goes: "When in Rome, then do as the Romans do!" So, if you wish to be a welcome and truly esteemed guest, please dress modestly. Covering your shoulders and avoiding short pants or mini skirts will just be fine!